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    Randall Rosenthal born 1947 in NY has become famous creating what appears to be a cardboard box stuffed to the brim with...
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    Hooooooly fuck
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Randall Rosenthal born 1947 in NY has become famous creating what appears to be a cardboard box stuffed to the brim with wads of cash. In reality, both the box and the cash are carved out of wood and hand painted to jaw-dropping, lifelike precision by the artist. Though Rosenthal’s portfolio of work also includes wood recreated as newspapers, baseball cards, binders, books and more, it is his sculptures of money that have particularly captured the public’s eye.

"Half the time is spent on carving and half is spent on painting, they’re the exact opposite processes. I start with a block of wood and it’s totally reductive in that I take away wood until I get what I want.

The carving is a high-wire act because there’s no room for error and I don’t plan it out, the painting is the opposite. You can paint on the paint forever, until you get what you like.” (by )

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